Grad Students

Graduate students based at the DMC are enrolled in the University of Maine’s School of Marine Sciences Graduate Program and are pursing a M.S. or Ph.D. in Marine Biology, Oceanography or Marine Policy.


Cheyenne AdamsCheyenne Adams
M.S. candidate, Marine Biology
Larry Mayer and Paul Rawson

cheyenne.adams@maine.edu

Research Interests: The role of detritus in the nutritional ecology of bivalves, biogeochemistry and nutrient cycling in coastal systems, and restoration ecology.


picture of KateKate Coupland
Ph.D. candidate, Oceanography
Advisor: Damian Brady

catherine.coupland@maine.edu

Research interests: Quantifying the biological and physical drivers of primary production and carbonate chemistry in the Damariscotta River oyster aquaculture growing area, and understanding the interplay between them.


picture of MarinaMarina Cucuzza
M.S. candidate,  Dual Degree Program, Marine Biology & Marine Policy
Advisors: Dr. Heather Leslie and Dr. Josh Stoll

marina.cucuzza@maine.edu
More Information

Research interests: For my dual Masters in Marine Biology and Marine Policy at UMaine, I am interested in exploring the human and environmental dimensions of coastal sustainability.  My research focuses on resilience and management of Maine’s fishing communities in the face of ecological and social change.


Tyler Fountain
M.S. candidate,  Marine Biology
Advisor: Dr. Rhian Waller

c.tyler.fountain@gmail.com


picture of ParkerParker Gassett
M.S. candidate,  Dual Degree Program, Marine Biology & Marine Policy
Advisor: Dr. Aaron Strong

parker.gassett@maine.edu

Research Interests: Community scale involvement with environmental governance, coastal resilience, and science communication. Parker’s current work surrounds citizen science monitoring for coastal acidification in the Northeast.


Andrew GoodeAndrew Goode
Ph.D. candidate in Oceanography
Advisor: Dr. Damian Brady

Andrew.Goode@maine.edu
More info

Research Interests: how oceanographic conditions and processes influence ecologically and economically important species in the Gulf of Maine. The two main species my research focuses on are the American lobster, Homarus americanus, and the Eastern/American oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Recruitment processes of lobster invariably affect the abundance of harvestable individuals, and understanding the oceanographic influence to benthic recruitment of juveniles is key in understanding population dynamics in a stochastic and changing ocean environment. In contrast, much of the oyster population dynamics are now largely influenced by nearshore aquaculture. With aquaculture being a multi-million dollar industry for coastal Maine per year it is key in understanding ideal locations for aquaculture sites and the upper population limit that those sites can reasonably sustain. Combining oceanographic modeling and oyster biology we can identify regions along Maine, and within certain bays/estuaries, that can sustain large oyster populations via aquaculture. Identification of these regions would inform oyster aquaculture site selection and positively influence the economy of coastal Maine.


picture of CarlCarl Huntsberger
M.S. Candidate, Marine Biology
Advisor: Dr. Rick Wahle

carlton.huntsberger@maine.edu
More info

Research interests: to find an accurate way to determine a lobster’s age


Julia Johnstone
Ph.D. candidate, Marine Biology
Advisor: Dr. Rhian Waller

juliawjohnstone1@gmail.com


Nicholas Keeney
Ph.D. candidate, Oceanography
Advisor: Dr. Damian Brady

nicholas.keeney@maine.edu


picture of MauraMaura Niemisto
M.S. candidate,  Marine Biology
Advisor: Dr. Rick Wahle

maura.niemisto@maine.edu

Research interests: the effects of ocean  warming and acidification on the behavior, physiology, and gene expression of larval lobsters.


Kara Pellowe
Ph.D. candidate, Ecology and Environmental Sciences
Advisor: Dr. Heather Leslie

kara.pellowe@maine.edu


Ashley RossinAshley Rossin
M.S. candidate,  Marine Biology
Advisor: Dr. Rhian Waller

amrossin5@gmail.com

Research interests: The reproductive biology and ecology of cold-water and deep-sea invertebrates, primarily corals. I am especially interested in the anthropogenic impacts on the reproductive processes and the continuation of populations given climate change. My masters thesis is investigating the effects of ocean acidification on the gametogenesis of the red tree coral, Primnoa pacifica, which is an essential fish habitat in Southeastern Alaska.