News

Waller, Oppenheim and Bayer receive awards!

Jesica Waller, Noah Oppenheim and Skylar Bayer, graduate students at the Darling Maine Center, have received awards and recognition from the University of Maine. All three students are in UMaine’s School of Marine Sciences and are advisees of Dr. Rick Wahle. UMaine’s College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture (NSFA) presented Noah Oppenheim with the […]

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Geographies of Change

Dr. Rick Wahle has returned from a trip to the Andaman Islands where he was a guest instructor for a new course “Uncertain Islands: Geographies of Change” organized by the Dakshin Foundation and India Institute of Science in Bangalore, and the University of Wollongong, Australia. The goal of the course was to expose Australian students […]

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Perry discusses use of gliders in ocean research

The Environmental Monitor recently published an article about the use of remote sensing technology in inhospitable ocean environments. In the article, Dr. Mary Jane Perry discusses how the new technology proved essential in quantifying the North Atlantic spring phytoplankton bloom and it’s role in the global carbon cycle. Read the full story here.

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Science Saturday at the DMC

Middle school students from the midcoast and beyond gathered at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center (DMC) in Walpole for “Science Saturday.” Coordinated by UMaine Cooperative Extension and 4-H, the program offered area youth an opportunity to explore the physics of waves and water, learn how to grow an oyster, and observe microscopic marine […]

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Prentiss discovers new fanworm species

Five years ago, while snorkeling in the U.S. Virgin Islands , Nancy Prentiss spied and unfamiliar worm. After much research, collaboration and DNA testing, she’s been able to confirm Turbocavus secretus is indeed a new species of fanworm! Prentiss teaches biology at the University of Maine, Farmington. She received her master’s degree in zoology from the […]

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Bloom Plankton Hitches Rides on Eddies

School of Marine Science researchers based at the DMC, Mary Jane Perry, Ivona Cetinić and Nathan Briggs, are part of a team of researchers studying the North Atlantic Spring Bloom. Their most recent discovery is a mechanism–eddies–by which particulate organic carbon (phytoplankton) from the surface waters are pumped deep into the ocean. Their discovery was […]

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Miller Named 2015 Outstanding Professional Employee

We’re proud to announce that Timothy Miller, laboratory manager at the Darling Marine Center, has been selected to receive the University of Maine’s 2015 Outstanding Professional Employee Award.  Congratulations Tim! Read all about it at UMaine News.

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Boston Globe quotes DMC grad student

On March 7th, the Boston Globe featured an article on the effects of climate change and ocean acidification on shellfish in the Gulf of Maine.  The physiological impact of ocean acidification on lobster larvae was discussed Jes Waller, a UMaine graduate student at the DMC. Waller’s co-advisors are Dr. Rick Wahle, also at UMaine’s DMC, […]

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Slow-growing alga are time capsules of ocean climate

Dr. Bob Steneck and Dr. Doug Rasher are part of an international team of scientists studying growth rings in the long-living, slow-growing alga Clathromorphum nereostratum to unlock the mysteries of the North Pacific ocean environment. Using lasers to measure isotope ratios of boron locked in the calcium carbonate skeletons, the team has reconstructed 120 years of […]

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Horseshoe Crab Report – Local Effort

Andrew Goode, an undergraduate student from Boothbay, spent the summer of 2014 working at the Darling Marine Center with Dr. Rick Wahle on his Capstone project. The work involved summarizing population surveys of the Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) collected by volunteers of the Damariscotta River Association (DRA) over a 12 year period. “In Maine, […]

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